How big is a Micron?

 

Most fine filtration is measured in microns

Micrometer (micron) is a metric unit of measurement denoting one millionth of a meter. To give you some idea of how fine a micron is, consider that the smallest particle visible to the unaided human eye is about forty microns (you can see smaller particles through light diffraction).

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There are a few rules to remember when sizing a filtration system:

Differential

  • With in-depth cartridge filters, the slower the flow, the more efficient the cartridge is and the longer the user can go between change-outs. At Filters.com, we typically size housings to start out with a clean differential pressure of two pounds or less. You will find that many people in the filter business will quote housings that are undersized for an application so that they quote the lowest capital equipment cost.

 

  • The differential pressure (pressure drop) across both the cartridge and housing must be considered cumulatively. The pressure drop across the housing differs from housing to housing, but in most cases, it can be obtained from the housing manufacturer.

 

  • Assuming a cartridge vessel is designed for cartridges with a one-inch inside diameter, keep in mind that the flow through the bottom of each filter should not exceed 15-25 gallons per minute (for membrane pre-filters, try not to exceed 15 gpm). These flow rates should not be exceeded because turbulent flow is created on the interior core of the filter, which frequently cause unloading of contaminant from the filter media.

 

  • Always consider the viscosity of the material to be filtered when sizing filters or vessels. Also keep in mind that the viscosity of most materials varies depending on temperature. If you have an application where the customer does not want to go over a certain differential pressure and the temperature of the product can go through a wide swing, be careful to find out what the viscosity of the liquid is at both extremes of temperature.

 

Copyright 2008 Barney Corporation, Inc… www.Filters.com… Info@Filters.com…1.614.274.9069

 

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There are a few rules to remember when sizing a filtration system: 

With in-depth cartridge filters, the slower the flow, the more efficient the cartridge is and the longer the user can go between change-outs. At Filters.com, we typically size housings to start out with a clean differential pressure of two pounds or less. You will find that many people in the filter business will quote housings that are undersized for an application so that they quote the lowest capital equipment cost.
The differential pressure (pressure drop) across both the cartridge and housing must be considered cumulatively. The pressure drop across the housing differs from housing to housing, but in most cases, it can be obtained from the housing manufacturer.

Assuming a cartridge vessel is designed for cartridges with a one-inch inside diameter, keep in mind that the flow through the bottom of each filter should not exceed 15-25 gallons per minute (for membrane pre-filters, try not to exceed 15 gpm). These flow rates should not be exceeded because turbulent flow is created on the interior core of the filter, which frequently cause unloading of contaminant from the filter media.
Always consider the viscosity of the material to be filtered when sizing filters or vessels. Also keep in mind that the viscosity of most materials varies depending on temperature. If you have an application where the customer does not want to go over a certain differential pressure and the temperature of the product can go through a wide swing, be careful to find out what the viscosity of the liquid is at both extremes of temperature.
Copyright 2008 Barney Corporation, Inc… www.Filters.com… Info@Filters.com…1.614.274.9069

 

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This video helps you select the correct style Harmsco liquid filtration cartridge for your specific application.

Before you can determine what type of filter you will need, you need to identify what type of contaminates you are removing:

  • Is it a tiny particulate or a large solid?
  • Is it hard, fibrous, gelatinous?
  • Is it a liquid such as a solvent, oil, or ink?

The three main filter types are:

  • Depth Filters work best on liquid contaminates such as gels, solvents, ink and oils.
  • Bag Filters designed to work best with large contaminates.
  • Pleated Filters are most efficient for filtering particulates.

Harmsco Filter Types

Remember: a low-cost filter that needs frequent replacement costs more to use than a higher-cost filter that rarely needs to be changed.

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